Male Condom78527
Please enable Javascript

ANH14128 03:55

MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: For educational purposes the following animation contains graphic images of nudity and condom use. Viewer discretion is advised. A male condom is a thin sheath a man can wear on his erect penis during sex to prevent pregnancy. Using a condom can also reduce the risk of getting or spreading HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases also known as STDs. A man's reproductive fluid, called semen, is produced by the following glands: The testicles, also called testes, the seminal vesicles, and the prostate gland. During vaginal sex between a man and a woman, semen passes out of the man's penis and into the woman's vagina in a process called ejaculation. Semen contains '10s of millions of sperm. From the vagina, the sperm in the semen can travel to and fertilize an egg from the woman's body. Fertilization of the egg marks the beginning of human development. Condoms are sealed inside a plastic or foil package. Condoms made from latex, polyurethane, or polyisoprene also protect against HIV and STDs. Natural membrane, or lamb skin condoms, do not provide protection from HIV or other STDs. Do not use the condom if the package is open, torn, dried out, or past its expiration date. To protect against pregnancy or STDs, put the condom on before the penis touches any area inside or outside the woman's vagina. A new condom should be used the entire time during vaginal, anal, or oral sex. To use a condom, carefully remove it from its package to avoid tearing it. A reservoir, or space, at the tip of the condom collects semen during ejaculation. Pinch the reservoir, or at least a half inch space at the tip, to remove any air inside it. If the penis is uncircumcised, which means it still has foreskin, pull the foreskin back to expose the head, or glands, of the penis. If the penis is circumcised, the glands is already exposed because the foreskin has been removed. While still pinching the tip, place the condom over the glands and roll it along the entire length of the penis. Use only water-based lubrication on latex condoms. Oil based lubricants, such as baby oil, petroleum jelly, or lotion can weaken latex condoms and cause them to break. Stop any type of sex of the condom breaks or tears. Remove the torn condom and replace it with a new one before continuing to have sex. After ejaculation, grip the condom at the base of the penis while it is still erect and carefully withdraw it from the vagina so that semen doesn't spill out. Then remove the condom and throw it in the trash. Male condoms are about 98% effective at preventing pregnancy if used correctly each time you have sex. Condoms are about 82% effective with typical use, which means either you don't always use condoms or you don't use them correctly every time you have sex.

Back