Managing Bladder Cancer82487
Please enable Javascript

ANH18218 03:11

MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: You or someone you care about may have been diagnosed with bladder cancer. This video will help you understand how to manage it. The most common type of bladder cancer, called "urothelial carcinoma" or "transitional cell carcinoma," is a disease where cancer cells form in the tissue lining the inside of your bladder. For some people with bladder cancer, treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Afterward, you will receive a follow-up care plan from your healthcare team. Bladder cancer has a high risk of coming back, so it's important to go to all of your follow-up appointments. Your doctor will want to make sure the cancer has not returned and check for health problems resulting from treatment. If your bladder wasn't removed, it's important to get regular cystoscopy exams to check for cancer. During a cystoscopy, a thin viewing instrument will be inserted into your bladder to look for signs of cancer. Talk to your oncologist about any medications you are taking and continue to take them as prescribed by your doctor unless instructed otherwise. Take note of any side effects and tell your doctor. If you had bladder surgery or other treatments, follow any instructions you were given. You may also need to make some of the following healthy lifestyle changes. If you smoke, it's important to quit smoking. This lowers the risk for bladder cancer returning or getting other types of cancer. Limit how much alcohol you drink. It may reduce your risk of cancer returning. Eat a healthy diet with more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. This will help you stay strong and feel better. Become physically active. Activities like walking, riding a bicycle, or swimming, can help you feel better and less tired. Talk to your doctor before starting an exercise routine. Knowing you have cancer can be overwhelming. You may have worries about things like your condition and how it affects your family, treatments and hospital stays, medical bills, and your job. Fortunately, there are ways to cope with this. Remember that your doctor and healthcare team are there to answer any questions you have. The following sources of support can help you cope with your concerns: social workers, faith leaders, counselors, and support groups. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions about your treatment plan, medications, or lifestyle changes to help you manage bladder cancer. more

Back